Pedophilia in the Establishment- Why is Justice Being Prevented?

News of late has been riddled with various sex and child abuse scandals among prominent politicians, bankers and others stretching from the US across the Atlantic to the UK. Both countries pillars of western democracy.

Prince Andrews has been under the spotlight with child abuse allegations, and his relationship with Jeffrey Epstein, convicted of soliciting underage girls for prostitution.

It has emerged that Bill Clinton too was in constant contact with the Billionaire Epstein, and had regularly flew to his Florida properties.

People in the UK are no stranger to the legacy of politican Cyril Smith, a pedophile of historic proportions, whose activities were covered up by the British Parliament during the 1980’s. Proof is slowly emerging that Thatcher, and others knew the extent of child abuse that was occurring in prominent ranks of the UK Parliament, but chose to protect those involved.

All of these events are hideous, and truly shocking for everyone involved. whats increasingly hideous, is the obstruction of justice that is being implemented by the Government to protect the names and positions of those involved.

Bluntly, why are governments and state authorities protecting these pedophiles? Files and information regarding the names of individuals have been classified, and remain so in the “interests of national security”.

We, as taxpayers, are funding establishments that lie frequently to the people about political issues such as tax, fracking, the privatization of resources and State agencies, wars- and now pedophilia.

Where does the line stop?
This, if nothing else should be the wake up call to people that democracy is NOT working.

  • If Democracy is the a system designed “for the people, by the people”, why do UK residents have no say in the controversial Fracking legislation, despite 90% public opposition to it? Why is the UK’s NHS being privatized?
  • Why do US Citizens get dragged into foreign wars they don’t agree with until false pretenses of WMD?
  • Why are Irish citizens lied to about bank bailouts, forced to pay illegally implemented Water Charges which the majority are opposed to?

    And now, why are taxpayer funded Politicians, Policing organizations,and others trying to obstruct justice and protect a number of exploitative, despicable individuals?

    This is Democracy.

    An illusion of justice, freedom of choice, and honesty, maintained by instilling the fear that whilst our governments aren’t the best, they could be worse. Recent events make me wonder. Could they be?

    It takes certain type of people to condone and ignore child abuse. Yet, that’s whats running the country.


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Review of Russell Brand’s ‘Revolution’

Many of you may be shocked to learn of Comedian Russell Brand’s recent switch to political/current affair commentator. I know I was. Along with serious appearances on PrimeTime and elsewhere, in addition to Brand’s youtube channel “The Trews- News you can trust”, the comedian is using his name and charisma to provide his followers with a source of genuine unbiased political thought with regards to current affairs, terrorism, corporations, and a lot more. He has been involved with a number of protests such as the Irish Water Protests, marches against austerity measures in London, and most recently the New Era Housing estate movement. Many have been critical of Brand’s involvement and career change, and yet while Brand’s trademark egocentric,downright barmyness features strongly throughout, it in a way validates the overall earnestness of his agenda.


Russell Brand
Brands latest book Revolution is similar to The Trews in ways- the sometimes seemingly directionless ravings, the critique of modern day news reporting, politicians and figureheads, the sarcasm, the breakdown of overly complicated political jargon to layman terms, and more seriously, a persistent nudge in the direction of a worldwide, peaceful revolution.

How to take an ex sex and drug addict seriously on such a sombre level? Especially when the blatant hypocrisy of a celebrity whose benefited significantly from the exact structures he claims are failing is acknowledged? Well, I suppose you don’t have to. However, the research in Revolution which reference notorious academics such as Dave Graeber and Noam Chomsky among others, lend Brands work a credibility not so easily refuted, and coupled with Brand’s explanation of serious political and revolutionary ideologies through humorous means, make Revolution appealing to those without an interest in politics. And even if you don’t agree, its both an eye opening and entertaining read. If nothing else, Revolution provides insight to the reader of Brand’s own realization of the unfairness, greed and injustice that is rampant through all strata of society today. And he puts it simply:

“Unless you are the CEO of a a major corporation, you too in 2014-15 are repaying taxes to a Government that doesn’t represent you; they represent the interests of big business.”


Its worth noting that much of Brand’s work references spiritualism and faith,and specifically a spiritual revolution. It all sounded a bit too tree-hugging-hippy-ish to me too. But under all the spiritual anecdotes, there is some solid sense and logic to Brand’s thinking. Does Revolution call for a revolution? Yes, in a way, though not through the traditional connotations. He references Gandhi, in that people need to “Be the change” and that to truly see the injustices and failing of modern day democracy, we must break away from the capitalistic and materialistic mindsets so embedded in society.
Possible? Of course.new
Appealing? To some.
Successful? Depends.

Overall, Revolution is a work designed to, if not inspire mass revolt, then to encourage people to think for themselves and challenge the economical,corporate and political systems of today. To question the logic of following, maintaining and supporting a system that in all honesty, does not benefit the majority, but the elite few. Revolution is deliberately not overtly serious and thoroughly researched as to disengage readers, and this is where its success is, as those without an interest in politics and economics are not alienated. The lack of such may pose issues for the more academically minded, but even so it still references controversial topics such as trade agreements, foreign policy, bank bailouts and tax evasion. Arguably, it may just be the regurgitated rhetoric of pre-existing academics and ideologies, mingled with spiritualism and black humor, but regardless its a stimulating, provocative and engaging read.